Reviews


LIVE REVIEW – Phenomenal singing with Jenny Wren and her Borrowed Wings
The
Podium Café, Peter en Leni, Steendam (NL)
19.05.17

THE NEXT GIG (NL)
Richard Waganaar
20th May 2017

Behind the stage of Peter & Leni in Steendam, hiding behind her big double bass and her two band members is the almost unnoticed Jenny Trilsbach. However, the people who previously attended a Jenny Wren and Her Borrowed Wings concert know that this is the spot on the stage to keep an eye on. The band is not named after Paul McCartney’s song, but to the Wren, in the Netherlands the Winter King. A little bird with a huge song to match the phenomenal singing voice of Trilsbach. With ‘Out With The Old’ as the first song there is straight away a head scratching moment, where the audience is completely surprised by a voice that contains so much power and emotion while at the same time being raw and melodic. Jenny-Wren-and-her-B-W
Jenny Wren and Her Borrowed Wings are one of those growing brillants that occasionally come from the British Isles to entertain us with their wonderful mix of blues, R & B with influences of country and soul. Strong point is the vocal, but also fine guitar work by Ben Gallon and soundproofing resonator guitar work by Ben Fisher with the trilbach bassist to complete the trilogy. The formation have just released the new album ‘A Soup’ as a sequel to their debut ‘Dead Man’s Hat’. On stage a wonderful mix of both albums and also new songs coming on the yet to be recorded third album of the trio. Strong point is the change, from ultra sensitive to a true party number and from tortoise to cheetah speed. Especially this was an acoustic concert, only enhanced with microphones on stage and no plugged instruments. It made everything even more beautiful. Strong songs like ‘Twisted Nail’, ‘This Song is A Lie’ and ‘Some Big Deal’ brought the concert to an extremely high level early on. Very impressive that this British band was able to hold that high level of energy for the rest of the concert. The love for the music and wishing to share with the audience was at the forefront. The songs were beautifully spoken by the singer and hope was given for the future. A new album is hopefully on the horizon for next year, and with the beautiful ‘Hard Blues’ and ‘Cast out the Snake’ it looks to be another jewel.
As the concert progresses, n
ice were the transitions too. From the delicate and beautiful ‘Days Gone’, then to the atmosphere being spirited off to New Orleans for party number ‘Dead Man’s Hat’. After the sensitive ‘Wooden Nickels’ and the smooth swinging ‘Bumblebee’, the concert was complete. But because the band clearly have so much fun playing together their music and following applause after applause, they returned with the sensitive ‘Until It’s My Time To Go’ followed after the announcement was called out to Peter van Zeijl, can we do another, by ‘Too Tired’ a highlight from their debut album.

A sensationally beautiful concert.

Read review in Dutch here…
http://thenextgig.nl/fenomenale-zang-bij-jenny-wren-her-borrowed-wings/


Jenny Wren and Her Borrowed Wings  – A SOUP 

BLUES BLAST MAGAZINE
USA
Greg “Bluesdog” Szalony
March 2017

This acoustic trio from the U.K. dabbles in music that takes from roots music, blues, jazz, old timey music and folk music. Jenny Trilsbach handles lead vocal and double bass while Ben Gallon plays acoustic guitar anFRONT COVER for Headed paperd Ben Fisher on Resophonic guitar. Both Bens supply backup vocals. There are no guest musicians and all compositions are generated by the members. Although the instrumentation is the same throughout, they keep things fresh with a variety of rhythms and guitar interplay. Jenny’s voice has a bit of a rough edge to it and that lends a touch of authenticity to the songs. The guitarists work out very enjoyable intertwining guitar parts. The band accomplishes a lot with a little.

The opening “A Sailor’s Blues” flies sprightly by, clocking in 1:32, featuring some nice slide playing by Ben Fisher. Next up is the slow and deliberate ballad “The Leaving”. Jenny’s voice attains a melancholy and yearning quality. The guitar here is liltingly lovely. “Until It’s My Time To Go” maintains a similar vibe. Jenny’s voice cries out at the appropriate times. Ben Gallon’s guitar takes on the jazzy spirit of Django Reinhardt on the upbeat “Don’t Bring Me Down”. The whimsical and breezy “Brick By Brick” gets a similar treatment.

Ben Fisher provides some mellow slide playing on “Some Big Deal”. Jenny’s bass is prominent on the beat heavy “Sucker On The Vine”. The slow “This Song Is A Lie” is the recipient of some very nicely melodic guitar from both players. All three players are in tandem at the onset of “The Promised Land”, a song that harkens back to the hey day of folk music.

A nice change of pace from three gifted and imaginative musicians. Rest your weary ears upon the intricate and often jazzy acoustic guitar play. The band has crafted interesting lyrics to compliment the creative music within. This CD is a welcome relief to the usual electric guitar barrages we have been so used to. Give a listen to this collection of well crafted original tunes. It’s no easy task pulling well done songs out of thin air.

Reviewer Greg “Bluesdog” Szalony hails from the New Jersey Delta.



Jenny Wren and Her Borrowed Wings  – A SOUP 

EARSHOT MAGAZINE
CANADA
Steve Marlow
January 2017

Some wonderfully inventive things can happen when a distinctly American style of music is interpreted by non-Americans. In this case, it’s classic blues and country. Jenny Wren and Her Borrowed Wings hail from the UK and they bring a UK folk mind-set to traditional American blues, folk and country. Whereas classic blues tends toFRONT COVER for Headed paper be dour and a bit depressing, Jenny Wren brings a whimsy to the country blues sound of the American past. And American country tends to be about sorrow and heartache, Wren’s take on country is more playful and uplifting. The subject matter takes on a bit of a British tint too, with blues and country songs about sailors and creeping vines. With just two guitars, plus Jenny’s vocals and her own upright bass, the music is minimalist but the listener rarely feels like they’re missing anything. There’s even a bit of an old-time jazz swing feel to a number of these songs. A Soup is just their second album, and it’s a satisfying and mature album overall.

By Steve Marlow
Jan 3, 2017

http://www.earshot-online.com/reviews/DisplayReview.cfm?DiscID=181981


Jenny Wren and Her Borrowed Wings – A SOUP

REAL ROOTS CAFE
THE NETHERLANDS
December 2016

A particular slice of London, UK. Jenny Wren (Jenny Trilsbach) plays upright bass and sings with a bluesy, sexy voice. The Borrowed Wings are Ben Gallon (acoustic guitar, vocals) and Ben Fisher (resophonicFRONT COVER for Headed paper guitar, vocals). Jenny Wren and her Ben had been a nice name for the group. ‘A soup “is the second CD of Wren and her Bens after’ Dead man’s hat ‘from 2014. All songs are originals, three of Jenny, five gallon and four Fisher. The thirteenth song jointly written. I had my first listens, think of Eilen Jewell, the atmosphere is similar. But Wren and her boys embrace more (rhythm and) blues. And succeed wonderfully in order to come across pleasant. Especially the vocals of Jenny and Fisher guitar making its taste and pleasurable.
A surprisingly nice group, a surprisingly fun CD. For lovers of light rough female voices and tasty rhythm ‘n blues. (Creature Records)

Read review in Dutch here…
http://www.realrootscafe.com/2016/12/25/jenny-wren-her-borrowed-wings-a-soup/


Jenny Wren and Her Borrowed Wings – A SOUP

FRONT COVER for Headed paper

untitled
WRITTEN IN MUSIC
THE NETHERLANDS
Cis Van Looy
November 2016

Two guitars and a bass, with this ‘limited’ toolbox Jenny (Vibration Bach) Wren, an Essex native daughter, and Her Borrowed Wings fill their second recyclable cover packaged album. The acoustic guitars of Ben Gallon and Ben Fisher support the vocals of Wren, which the great bassist personally and enthusiastically grapples and cuddles in thirteen homemade songs composed alternately by Wren and Her Musical companions.

From the first song, A Sailor’s Blues you will get not only impressed that something special is going on. A Sailor’s Blues is a short rhythmic finger picking exercise that paves the way for the magnificent The Leaving, completely in the tradition of forgotten black blue ladies of a bygone age. The folky tune Until It’s Time To Go, pulls Wren’s raw vocal alongside the primitive rhythm of Sick And Tired (unrelated to the eponymous song by Chris Kenner, the R & B shouter from New Orleans) the only song written from the trio together.  Particularly contagious work and that can be said of the swinging ragtime of Don’t Bring Me Down.
Invariably played with inspiration, just listen to the elaborate Sucker On The Vine. Although we listen to Jenny sing somewhere ‘This song is a lie’, we witness this diverse collection of a disarming honesty that lasts more with each listening.
Her first album Dead Man’s hat was seen here shamefully overlooked, that should not happen with A Soup.  This stripped-down piece with an inventive combination of divergent rootsy styles, reflects a timeless allure and instantly creates the perfect occasion for a tour in our region.

By Cis Van Looy
Nov 7, 2016

Read review in dutch here…
http://www.writteninmusic.com/roots/jenny-wren-and-her-borrowed-wings-a-soup/


Jenny Wren and Her Borrowed Wings – A SOUP

BLUES MATTERS
UK
Alan Pearce
October 2016

Between Jenny Trilsbach’s pretty and strident vocal and some delightfully subtle playing from Ben Gallon and Ben Fisher this definitely does justice to the 13 songs here. I guess you would put them into the classic rhythm and blues genre with touches of country and even a little bluegrass hidden away in there. Fisher’s resophonic guitar is almost understated but you would definitely miss its influence and with no electric instruments on show (as well as no percussion) there is a disarming simplicity to the sound. Trilsbach plays a mean double bass but again, it doesn’t dominate as it can in some other bands. I tried – and failed – to think of whose pigeon hole I would pitch them into; they aren’t a FRONT COVER for Headed paperretro bluegrass band and they aren’t a throwback acoustic blues crew. Oddly enough the nearest thing I could think of – and they are nothing like them – was a cross between Dan Hicks and Katzenjammer. There is a swing feeling to some of their music and they clearly have influences from all over but the bottom line is that this is a band very much of their own making. Their debut album Dead Man’s Hat was very well received and there has been a fairly intense pressure for this album to be close to that high mark; in the end it stands up strongly to the previous album and proves that the band have been developing and growing. Lovely stuff.

By Alan Pearce
Oct 22, 2016


Jenny Wren and Her Borrowed Wings – A SOUP

ROOTSTIME
BELGIUM
Dani Hayvaert
September 2016

Jenny Wren is a young English multi-instrumentalist from Essex, England, which is to come to its second record in trio form with her companions, the Bens, Gallon and Fisher, a highly skilled on the Resophonic, the other on ‘ordinary’ acoustic guitar. Her real name Jenny is just called Vibration Bach and she is the vocal face of the band.
In this new album the trio presents thirteen self-penned songs, neatly divided between the three band members and, as already mentioned, sober little arranged with no more than three acoustic instruments (four, if you count the voice) simultaneously.FRONT COVER for Headed paper

Three quarters of an hour the band takes you on a journey that leads along many familiar houses from the roots music: sometimes there’s country, sometimes blues, sometimes they go the old-time Tour, then again bring soul and rhythm & blues the upper hand. This leads to a very diverse, very listenable record, which this trio makes merged and play together the instruments in a very original and innovative way, which appears to have a very nice side effect: I listen six times and seven times more and more and I want to see this trio live in action.
Now, in the meantime, I sample the cocktail of music on the plate before me- The opener ‘A Sailor ‘s Blues’, ‘The Leaving’ about yearning, languorous, and almost as sad ‘Until it’s Time to Go’ which Jenny optimally showcases her vocal qualities and then to the swinging ‘Don’t Bring Me Down’, but just as much of anything lomere, jazzy ‘Brick by Brick’ and the sister thereof ‘A-Creeping’ with its delicate vocals of the guys through it, to the closing ‘The Promised Land’, this is a CD that makes you long for a smoky nightclub, the kind where the lighting is scarce, the drinks too expensive but the music excellent.
I wish I could have Jenny Wren to hear live in my home, until that becomes reality, this record will often come to the CD player and will accompany us on many an overnight road trip. And a fine, attractive package from all recycled materials.

Fine album from a band that our northern neighbours already had seen but once again descend urgently needs to Brussels!

By Dani Heyvaert
SEP, 2016

http://rootstime.be/index.html?http://rootstime.be/CD%20REVIEUW/2016/SEPT1/CD14.html


LIVE REVIEW – Jenny Wren and her Borrowed Wings sends Steendam swinging
Podium Café, Peter en Leni

THE NEXT GIG
THE NETHERLANDS

Richard Waganaar
April 2016

STEENDAM, NETHERLANDS – Before the concert Jenny Wren is anything but reminiscent of a Rhythm and Blues Diva, soft voice and a bit shy. But once on the stage behind her bass, she opens her mouth in ‘Twisted Nail’ and we can hear that there is clearly a unique voice at the Podium cafe for Peter and Leni in Steendam, for the first Dutch performance of the three piece Jenny Wren and her Borrowed Wings.
Besides front woman Jenny Wren are Ben Fisher with his resonator guitar and Ben Gallon with his acoustic guitar. Jenny Wren’s shyness soon expires 9and by the end of the first set, we hear the band as a wonderful company that makes devotedly music based on the mastery of their instruments, the strong vocals, also in harmony and beautiful own compositions. Great songs come by. Occasionally some more mellow as ‘Too Tired’, sensitive ‘Days Gone’ and the beautiful’ Her Dreams’. The focus of the first set is the end to wonderful probing ‘Until It’s My Time To Go’ a song about aging and Wren lets us hear the great depth in her voice, and she then reveals the raw edge and beautiful ‘My Only Friend’.
After the break, it is a beautiful fantastic concert. The power and depth of the vocals are at their best. With two swinging songs’ Show Time’ and ‘The Start’ the foot is firmly on the gas. One with ‘The Leaving’ gas taken back, but that is a run up to the great and sung with power ‘Brick by Brick’ and after another breather in ‘Wooden Nickels’ follows the phenomenal ‘Dead Man’s Hat’ the title track of the debut CD from Jenny Wren and her Borrowed Wings. Three-tempo songs including ‘The Sailor’s Blues’ brings the concert to an end. The audience claps for more and bring the band back on stage. They turn off the electrics, venture into the audience and the band plays acoustically the wonderful classic ‘Trouble in Mind’ as an encore.
What an introduction!
A beautiful company of musicians who deliver their songs with passion, based on an excellent control of their instruments and with the extraordinary voice of Jenny Wren.

Richard Waganaar
Apr 12, 2016

Read in Dutch here…
http://thenextgig.weebly.com/recensies-2016.html


Jenny Wren and her Borrowed Wings – Dead Man’s Hat

AMERICANA-UK
UK

Matthew Boulter
February 2015

Back to Basics trio playing anglicised Americana –
Jenny Wren and her Borrowed Wings are a relatively new three piece whose Spartan arrangements sound earnest and intricate in equal measure. Jenny sings and plays double bass while her Borrowed Wings, Ben Fisher and Ben Gallon, cd-front-smallplay resonator and acoustic guitars. There are eleven tracks on ‘Dead Man’s Hat’, which combine mainly Jenny’s lyrical musings on life and love while the two Bens’ dirt road sounding guitars dance with each other in the background. The individuality of each player comes across in this debut and it does not seem surprising that both Jenny and the two Bens have forged their own musical niches, alone and as part of an impressive array of artists across the Americana genre, before coming together for this record. ‘Dead Man’s Hat’ is an honest sounding record displaying three musicians at their most intuitive and sympathetic.

Matthew Boulter
Feb 17, 2015

http://www.americana-uk.com/index.php/cd-reviews/item/jenny-wren-and-her-borrowed-wings-dead-man-s-hat